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WRPR 161: Written on the Body (HC)

Writing Program 161: Written on the Body: Narrative & the Construction of Contemporary Sexuality (Bradway) Spring 2014

Finding Book Chapters / Essay Collections

Before conducting your search:

  • Consider how your argument might be broken down into keywords or phrases.

  • Compile a list of synonyms for those keywords.  What other terms might scholars use to talk about your topic, and how do these terms reflect the type of argument scholars are making?  (E.g., publishing vs. dissemination)

  • Consider which intersections among your keywords will be useful for searching

See the Search Tips tab for additional information about searching Tripod and other catalogs.

Finding Books

Use TRIPOD to find books and other material owned by the Tri-College libraries.

Use WorldCat to find books not held by the Tri-College libraries.

In order to find books in either catalog, conduct either a relevant:

Keyword Search:

E.g., "same-sex marriage" AND (law OR legislat*)

         "sexual perversion"

         "sexual freedom" AND morality

         ("same-sex marriage" OR "gay marriage") AND normal*

(See the Search Tips tab for more information on how to construct keyword searches.)

Or Subject Search:

E.g.,  Sexual ethics

Homosexuality—History

Same-sex marriage [full list, Tripod]

Same-sex marriage [Broad subject heading]

Same-sex marriage—Cross-cultural studies

Same-sex marriage—Handbooks, manuals, etc.

         (Use the Browse Books & More link or use the Advanced Search function [limited to the subject field] to find additional subject headings.)

Search Tripod

Selected Books

Tracing Cited References

Researchers can often find useful scholarship by identifying one particularly relevant book or article and seeing which sources that text cites.  With print texts, this process might involve checking the bibliography.  In some databases, you can also trace citations forward in time and find subsequent material that cites a particularly useful resource.  Use the following databases to find a relevant resource and then see which later texts cite the one with which you start.  Keep in mind, however, that the citations will no be comprehensive—i.e., the citations will often be limited by the scope of the database in which you're working.