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SOAN 001: Intro to Anthro & Soc (SC)

Sociology and Anthropology 001: Introduction to Anthropology and Sociology - Johnson and Schuetze (Fall 2016)

What kind of source is this?

Journal article citations will usually include a volume number, issue number, year, and page numbers:


Collins, Patricia Hill. "Learning from the outsider within: The sociological significance of black feminist thought." Social problems 33.6 (1986): S14-S32.
 

Book chapter citations from edited volumes will usually include 2 names or sets of names (the chapter author and the editor), the word "in," and either "edited by" or an abbreviated form (e.g. "ed," "eds").
 

Finley, Erin P. "War and Dislocation: A Neuroanthropological Model of Trauma among American Veterans with Combat PTSD." In The Encultured Brain: An Introduction to Neuroanthropology, edited by Daniel H. Lende and Greg Downey, 263-90. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2012.
 

Monograph (i.e. single-author book) citations are usually relatively simple, compared to other kinds of citations.
 

Cohen, Cathy J. Democracy remixed: Black youth and the future of American politics. Oxford University Press, 2010.

How was this source published?

For a journal article, evaluate the journal (publication) in which the article was published.
 

Collins, Patricia Hill. "Learning from the outsider within: The sociological significance of black feminist thought." Social problems 33.6 (1986): S14-S32.
 

Try searching Google Scholar for the publication title. (Use the drop-down menu in the search box.) 

How long has the journal been in publication?
How widely cited are articles published in this journal?

• You can also see how many times this particular article has been cited.

• Tools like Scimago's Journal Rank offer another (albeit imperfect) estimate of a journal's reputation.

• Beyond citation counts, you can always ask a knowledgeable person in the field (e.g. your professor) about the journal's reputation.

 

For a book chapter or a monograph, find out the name of the publisher who published this book.
 

Cohen, Cathy J. Democracy remixed: Black youth and the future of American politics. Oxford University Press, 2010.
 

• Is the publisher a university press?

• If you can't tell, try looking up other books published by this press (in Tripod or Google):

Do these appear to be scholarly works (e.g. written by scholars, including sources and citations)?

If you find an interesting book that seems scholarly, but is published by a non-university press, carefully look into the author's background and expertise.

You can also use Google Scholar to look up how many times and by whom a scholarly book has been cited. (Sometimes, Web of Science also works well for this.)

Who wrote this source?

Use Google to find out about an author's background and credentials.
 

• Is this author affiliated with a college or university? What department are they in?

• Does this author have a graduate degree in a relevant field, or some other claim to relevant expertise?
 

If the author has a very common name and you can't find this specific person, try running a search limited to just .edu domains (note: .edu is only used for websites of US higher education institutions).